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8 Maisonettes You’d Think Are Landed Homes, Just By These Photos Alone

July 26, 2022
BOOKMARK

The envy is real.

Fun fact: only 5% of Singaporeans live in landed homes. And considering how much it costs to own one, this statistic doesn’t at all come as a surprise.

But here’s the thing: you don’t actually need to live in landed property for your home to look (and feel) the part. With floor areas that rival that of terrace houses, proper space planning and design features to boot, the following HDB maisonettes could easily pass off as landed homes – at a fraction of the cost!

Intrigued? Read on to find out more!


1. A bright and airy maisonette in Tampines | Renovation costs: $132,000

Tampines by Free Space Intent

Interior Firm: Free Space Intent

Tampines by Free Space Intent

If the ID hadn’t told us this is in fact a maisonette, we would have automatically assumed it to be a landed home. For one, the way each room is laid out makes it look insanely airy and spacious for an HDB flat. Secondly, its decor may be homey and unassuming, but it’s certainly timeless – much like what you’d find in landed homes that can go decades without a revamp, and still look current.

Tampines by Free Space Intent

One unique feature we’d like to highlight, though, is its double-height service yard. It truly resembles a backyard for laundry in a landed home, don’t you think?


2. A Bishan HDB maisonette with a double-height living area | Renovation cost: $155,000

Bishan Street 13 by Design 4 Space

Interior Firm: Design 4 Space

Speaking of double-height spaces, we just had to share this one with you. Anchored with warm wood tones and dark neutrals like grey and black, the lower level of this maisonette is juxtaposed to the white walls and clear glass window above. This contrast draws the eyes up towards the double-height area, creating a sense of vertical spaciousness that you’d typically only experience in a loft or landed home.

Bishan Street 13 by Design 4 Space

Other honourable mentions:

  • Floor-to-ceiling fluted panels that add to the visual elongation
  • Full-height mirror behind the dining area that makes it look twice as large
  • Choice of an L-shaped sofa to keep the living area looking open and roomy

3. A Serangoon maisonette with an open-concept first floor that looks massive | Renovation costs: $115,000

Serangoon North Avenue 3 by Dyel Design

Interior Firm: Dyel Design

In this 143 sqm maisonette, the original study and kitchen were merged to form a lengthy kitchen fitted with foldable glass doors. This prevents fumes from escaping while cooking is in progress and, as pictured above, allows for visual continuity such that you’re able to see the entire floor area of the lower level!

Explore: Breaking Boundaries: 9 Clever Ideas for Flexible Living Spaces

Serangoon North Avenue 3 by Dyel Design

But that’s not all. The kitchen’s island pulls double-duty as a space for food prep and an extension of the dining table right next to it. Together, they can sit up to 11 pax comfortably – not something most HDB kitchens can accommodate!


4. A maisonette in Bukit Panjang that has the makings of a typical landed home | Renovation costs: $71,000

Jelapang Road by Yang's Inspiration Design

From layout to staircase design (think dark brown balusters and under-stairs storage closet), the living room of this apartment looks just like that of a classic contemporary (pardon the oxymoron) landed home.

Jelapang Road by Yang's Inspiration Design

And it’s not just the interior that could pass it off as a landed home. Located on the ground floor, it also happens to have a garden view that truly seals the deal.


5. A minimalist white haven for two in Hougang | Renovation costs: $95,000

Hougang Avenue 8 by Toke & Chen

Interior Firm: Toke & Chen

Minimalist homes, with their bare surroundings and clean-lined architecture, can sometimes come off as too sterile or even harsh. But not in this maisonette that strikes the right balance of “clean and cosy”.

Hougang Avenue 8 by Toke & Chen

Needless to say, its all-white interior on the first floor is exceedingly bright and airy, and is a far cry from your average HDB flat (in fact, it looks like a tech mogul’s mansion from a futuristic Sci-Fi movie). But head on up to the second floor, and you’ll find spaces that have a much warmer and cosier feel to them!

Read the full renovation story here: ‘80s Maisonette Turned into a Minimalist White Haven for Two

Hougang Avenue 8 by Toke & Chen
Hougang Avenue 8 by Toke & Chen
Pasir Ris Street 53 by Posh Home

Interior Firm: Posh Home

Stone surfaces like marble (and even engineered ones like quartz) have long been a staple in luxe homes. From feature walls to floors to table tops, this maisonette in Pasir Ris definitely isn’t lacking in them.

Pasir Ris Street 53 by Posh Home
Pasir Ris Street 53 by Posh Home

But our favourite feature has got to be its sleek black marble staircase with clear glass panels in place of railings, along with uber-contemporary lighting fixtures. If this doesn’t look like it belongs in a tycoon’s bungalow, we don’t know what does.


7. A warm and inviting white-and-wood maisonette in Hougang | Renovation costs: $120,000

Hougang Avenue 8 by 360 Interior

Interior Firm: 360 Interior

Sporting a white-and-wood theme paired with warm lighting throughout, this 130 sqm maisonette in Hougang is as inviting as it gets. We particularly love the semi-open kitchen with a breakfast counter, and the fact that you can see the full length of the house as soon as you step in.

Hougang Avenue 8 by 360 Interior

… and might we add, it’s also got a spacious hotel-like bathroom!


8. A Bishan maisonette that nails the dark and cosy aesthetic | Renovation costs: $170,000

Bishan Street 22 by The Interior Lab

Interior Firm: The Interior Lab

Bishan Street 22 by The Interior Lab

Clad in dark surfaces all around, this maisonette in Bishan certainly has an air of modern sophistication to it. Upon entry, you’ll be greeted by a proper entryway comprising an L-shaped shoe-settee-cum-storage-area. Let’s pause and take a moment to think about it: how many HDB flats in Singapore can afford space like that?

Bishan Street 22 by The Interior Lab

And despite its sheer size (of a whopping 160 sqm!) and dark interiors, it still manages to look really cosy with the help of warm cove and ambient lighting that illuminate each space oh-so-softly. Now this is how you nail the dark and cosy look.

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